Moving Forward, Leaving My Book Behind, Good Things To Come

Thank you to all who took the time to comment on my last two posts. Your participation is important for me to be motivated to keep writing here.

I have some sad news about my book, The Thrifty Yankee’s Guide to Frugal Living. It’s only 1/3 finished (managing the pain after my fall on the ice and endocrine disorder issues/testing further delayed my writing) and I won’t resume until after coronavirus is history.  I know you’re thinking, wait, what do you mean? We need to learn how to live with less now more than ever! We need Yankee thrift!

Yes, that’s true and not to worry, I will continue to share my frugal living tips here in this new landscape. However what I’ve written so far in my book applies to a different world. Examples? Talking about eating out less where now we can’t at all; a whole section on how to yard sale like a pro where I share my hard-earned secrets when in reality for the foreseeable future (a year or more?) buying second-hand in crowded spaces won’t be happening. Those are just a couple of examples, but really the issue is that the overall approach would come across as tone-deaf now. This represents a loss of income I had planned on for this summer but this sort of thing is happening for so many of us. (By the way  L.L.Bean which is normally open 24/7, even during the big ice storm of ’98 had to install locks because they, too are closed.)

Continue reading “Moving Forward, Leaving My Book Behind, Good Things To Come”

Are You Priced Out of The Housing Market?

Record-breaking news here in Maine: Housing sales are up 23 percent from a year earlier and the median price went up 8 percent. The median cost for a home in my county went up to $325,000 from $307,000 a year ago. Nationwide, median sales prices also rose to $274,500 from $254,700 a year earlier. When I bought my house in 2009 it was after the housing bubble had crashed. I rented my entire life up until age forty. Are we in a housing bubble now? Time will tell, but the reality is that if you can’t afford to buy a house, it’s not a good time to buy. This post is for those of you who may believe that you’re throwing your money away by renting. 

Continue reading “Are You Priced Out of The Housing Market?”

Why Frugal People Pay to Join AARP

I was so excited when I turned 49 1/2! It meant that I could join AARP and get an AARP card! WHY would I be excited about getting older and flash something that isn’t, as one person pointed out to me, “a badge of honor?” Because I think it is! Not only that, but it’s what frugal people do to save money now and in the future. For starters, if you have AT&T for your mobile you save 10% on your bill and 15% on wireless accessories! After factoring my annual membership fee I’m making money right away! More importantly AARP lobbies to keep Social Security and Medicare strong, drug prices low and advocates for many other things that DO affect your wallet. I also get their monthly publications that highlight important things like how to deal with ageism in the workplace.

I know many of you are thinking that you want nothing to do with AARP because it means you’re “getting old.”

Continue reading “Why Frugal People Pay to Join AARP”

Good Old Yankee Thrift: The Book!

I’m ready to announce that my current book-in-progress is about Yankee Thrift! This summer I created my outline and gathered my research materials which I have been reading and studying.

This isn’t going to be an academic book but will definitely include historic texts. I’ll share my reflections of living in subsidized housing while attending a wealthy Upper East Side prep school in Manhattan during the excesses of the 1980s before moving to New England to live a simple, frugal life. The lessons learned about Yankee frugality from my time spent living in Vermont and Maine has been nothing short of transformative. I will share those powerful lessons and principles with you in this book!

Yankee Thrift Is Good Business

Hello everyone! What a lovely summer it has been here in Maine! I hope to share a garden update within the next couple of weeks.

I’m thrilled to announce that I have begun writing a secret book that I think you will enjoy reading once it’s complete! It’s like my fingers are on FIRE* when I sit with my laptop each morning.

Now that I’m embracing writing as a full-time job as a means for an income I have to be business-like in my approach in addition to having enough passion about the material to keep me energized. A nice problem to have is that I have more interesting projects than I do time. I wish to continue blogging here, too, and that is income-free but not without expense. That’s why I apply good old Yankee Thrift to business savvy decision-making!

Continue reading “Yankee Thrift Is Good Business”

The Good Life: Yankee Thrift in Action

With Wayne being a Baby Boomer and me, GenX, retirement is something for which our budget revolves around. When Wayne starts collecting social security it likely will be funded at 100%. For my generation? Not likely! Saving for us isn’t just a way of life but as old age approaches, a necessity.

In the examples below you’ll see how Yankee Thrift  is the way to a richer life for us. It’s about making smart purchases without the purpose of showboating. In other words it’s not about buying something because it’s on trend, or you need the latest model, or to feed an insecure desire to impress. It’s about quality and self-reliance with the smarts to know when you need to secure the services of a professional or invest in a big expenditure. We save where we can and spend more on where it counts. You’ll see how in each example we’re cutting back but it’s not a sacrifice:

Continue reading “The Good Life: Yankee Thrift in Action”

Yankee Thrift Explained, The New Yorker, 1961

Take thrift, that presumed state of misery and penny-pinching. Proper Yankee thrift, on the contrary, feels delicious. In my experience there is a kind of nausea that attends too long a time of buying too many clothes for too much money; of paying more for restaurant dinners than they are worth; of disgorging lavish tips for which one is not even thanked (as who doesn’t have to, these days).

Continue reading “Yankee Thrift Explained, The New Yorker, 1961”